Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Book Spotlight: Mistress Suffragette by Diana Forbes

Today we have a special treat for you! If you haven't had a chance to dive into some historical romance lately then check out this gem by Diana Forbes.



Title: Mistress Suffragette
Author: Diana Forbes
Publisher: Penmore Press
Pages: 392
Genre: Romance/Historical Fiction/Victorian/Political/NY Gilded Age Fiction
A young woman without prospects at a ball in Gilded Age Newport, Rhode nIsland is a target for a certain kind of “suitor.” At the Memorial Day Ball during the Panic of 1893, impoverished but feisty Penelope Stanton quickly draws the unwanted advances of a villainous millionaire banker who preys on distressed women—the incorrigible Mr. Daggers. Better known as the philandering husband of the stunning socialite, Evelyn Daggers, Edgar stalks Penelope.
Skilled in the art of flirtation, Edgar is not without his charms, and Penelope is attracted to him against her better judgment. Meanwhile a special talent of Penelope’s makes her the ideal candidate for a paying job in the Suffrage Movement.
In a Movement whose leaders are supposed to lead spotless lives, Penelope’s torrid affair with Mr. Daggers is a distraction and early suffragist Amy Adams Buchanan Van Buren, herself the victim of a faithless spouse, urges Penelope to put an end to it. But can she?
Searching for sanctuary in three cities, Penelope will need to discover her hidden reserves of courage and tenacity. During a glittering age where a woman’s reputation is her most valuable possession, Penelope must decide whether to compromise her principles for love.

Order Your Copy!

https://www.amazon.com/Mistress-Suffragette-Diana-Forbes-ebook/dp/B06XG3G2TFhttps://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/mistress-suffragette-diana-forbes/1125897662

 




Tuesday, June 6, 1893, Boston, Massachusetts

As luck would have it, the speaker at Tremont House that afternoon was a woman. I use the term loosely. Her name was Verdana Jones, and her topic, “The Dangers of Irrational Dress.” I had never considered the complex maze of corsets, petticoats, and bustles “Irrational,” but apparently others of my gender did and the sentiment had blossomed into a full-fledged Movement. Some of these undergarments were encumbrances, but they were all perfectly logical. Moreover, every woman in the world wore them.
            Like me, Verdana had red hair, but she wore it cropped in a mannish fashion that was most unbecoming to her otherwise fine features. She had a square chin and large, childlike eyes, and in a Boston fog I’d be willing to bet that she was often confused with a young boy. Her outfit contributed to this confusion. It was outlandish by modern standards and excessively unladylike. She sported a loose white tunic worn over ankle-length trousers, known as “bloomers,” and big, chunky boots instead of shoes.
            A small rectangular wooden platform rimmed the front of the spare lecture hall. Twenty hard-bitten women and three scraggly men dotted the aisles. The women, many sporting bonnets, looked dour and preoccupied as if they were gearing up for a contest of who could show the least expression on their faces. Verdana clomped up to a wooden lectern to deliver her tirade. I couldn’t help feeling that, by her dress anyway, she was a poor advertisement for her cause.
            “Those who would keep women down argue that ‘ladylike dress’ symbolizes discipline, thrift, respectability, and beauty,” Verdana bellowed in her giant bloomers. Her voice sounded throaty from too many cigarettes. “But any dress that requires corsets and tight-lacing is degrading and dangerous to a woman’s health,” she boomed. “Corsets and tight-lacing are designed to make our waists look tiny and our bosoms look large. Our undergarments are crafted to make us resemble ornaments. We women, outfitted like hourglasses, are ornaments in our own homes. And we spend all day inside our homes trying to struggle into our corsets, laced petticoats, complicated boned lining, and bustles, all so that we may decorate them on the outside with frills, ribbons, and lace. We are so pampered—or are we?”
            Her voice, thick with meaning, rose a horsey octave. “Instead of fretting over whether we have twenty-inch waists, we would be better served worrying about why we must depend on men to dress us up in these outrageous, unhealthy outfits. Why can’t we earn our own keep and decide for ourselves what we should wear?”
            One or two women applauded. Others silently knitted: some knitted clothing; others knitted their brows. All in all it was a sullen group. Mother was right about this Movement. It was filled with hardened, bitter women. I didn’t want any part of it.
            After Verdana’s harangue I rose to leave, in dire need of fresh air. I had never heard so much drivel about the evils of ladylike dress and the positive attributes of horrible bloomers. But Lucinda looked up at me like a sorrowful, brown-haired puppy dog that could not be wrested from her spot anytime soon. Her dark face wrinkled into an accordion fan of disappointment. I hesitated, not wanting to let down my friend.
            “Hallo there. The lady in the bustle!” Verdana cheerily called toward my buttressed behind. Recognizing that I was one of the few women in the hall outfitted in the very clothes she’d just lambasted, I intuited that she must be talking to me.
            “Excuse me?” I asked, turning around to face her. I felt twenty pairs of women’s eyes and three pairs of men’s riveted upon my rear.
            “Yes, you,” she called out from where she still stood on the stage. “Tell us. What do you think about Rational Dress?”
            “I-I-I’m not certain you want to hear.” Where oh where was the exit?
            “Obviously she prefers Irrational dress,” Lucinda playfully called out from her seat. She cupped her hands to her mouth like a speaking trumpet. “Just look at what she’s wearing.”
            I heard laughter from the crowd directed at me, even though Lucinda’s dress was not markedly different than my own.
            “This isn’t supposed to be a lecture,” Verdana announced. “It’s supposed to be a conversation. So, instead of leaving the fold before we’ve been properly introduced, why don’t you join me up here on the dais and defend what you’re wearing to the group.”
            Everyone in the room laughed.
            “Because I hate speaking in public,” I said, to even more laughter.
            What was it that my little sister had once said in the heat of an argument? You’re quite good at boring your class to death.
            “Then, don’t think of it as public speaking,” Verdana shouted. “Just come up here, and tell me how you feel.”
            I sighed. How did I feel? I felt betrayed. I felt that my parents should not have asked me to support them. They should have protected me instead of trying to send me to New York. I missed my home and my horse. I even missed Lydia a tiny bit. I was nowhere near old enough to be living on my own in a strange city. Verdana wanted my opinion? Then very well, she would get it. I liked corsets and petticoats and bustles. They offered some support in a world that was mostly unsupportive.
            I stared at Verdana. Did I want to dress like her? Not in a lifetime of Sundays. How would I feel if corsets were forbidden? As if the last domain over which I exerted any control had been taken away from me. They could take away my home. They could take away my fiancĂ©. But I’d be damned if I’d let them take away my corsets.
            I silently prayed to God that I wouldn’t make a fool of myself. Then I took a deep breath and strode up to the small wooden platform. I opened my mouth to speak. But if I had a thought, it flew out of my head.
            My mouth hung open. No words came out. I was speechless.
            “Just speak from the heart,” Verdana urged quietly. “It’s always best. You’ll see. So, I take it you like corsets?” she asked me in a normal speaking voice.
            “Uh—yes,” I said to her.
            Verdana nodded. Under her breath she said, “Good. Now, just explain why. Pretend there’s no audience and that you’re just talking to me.”
            “Fine,” I answered, frustrated at how small my voice sounded.
            She smiled. “Believe me, it’s a knack that develops with time. Just breathe.” She continued to slowly nod her head, silently willing the reluctant words from my mouth.
            I took another deep breath and felt my lungs expand. “Hello, my name is Penelope.” I exhaled. Phew. That was hard.
            “Your last name?” she asked.
            “Huh?”
            “What is your last name, dear?” she coaxed.
            “Uh—Stanton.” I felt my face get hot. Little wisps of hair stuck to my face.
            “Any relation to Elizabeth Cady Stanton?”
            “No.” I felt like I had to think about each word, almost like a foreigner struggling to speak English.
            “Good,” she said, continuing to nod her head. “You see? It’s not so very difficult. Keep going.”
            I pushed the wet hair up off my face and turned to the crowd. “I enjoy the prevailing fashions, as you can see.” Thank God. A whole sentence.
            “I can,” she said, with a broad wink at the audience. “Tell us more.”
            I pointed to my light pink gown. I twirled around to model it for the group. Some tepid applause followed, which surprised me. Two women set aside their knitting.
            Emboldened, I continued. “But I came to Boston to escape from the advances of a particular man, not all men, and do hope that what I’m wearing today won’t prevent me from socializing with the men, or more importantly, the women of Boston.”
            A few women clapped. I thrust back my shoulders, lifted my chin, and met Lucinda’s eyes. “To me, it matters not if a woman’s waist is twenty inches, twenty-one inches, or even twenty-six inches—as long as it doesn’t prevent her from keeping her mind open.”
            A burst of light applause followed, and I only wished that my sister had been there to witness it.
            “Corsets and petticoats offer some structure,” I pressed, “in a world that unravels as I speak.” My voice was strong, and the words were coming readily. “Every day, another bank fails. Our institutions falter. As women, we can fall to pieces or we can stay strong.” I pointed to my torso and looked about the audience, meeting one woman’s eyes and then another. “Structure, shape, support. I will wear my corset proudly, as I face another day.”
            Verdana bowed her boyish head at me and stretched out her arms diagonally, one below her hip, the other high above her head. “And that, ladies and gents, is the other side of the argument,” Verdana boomed to heartfelt applause.
            “Sorry I didn’t let you finish,” she whispered, as the audience applauded. “For a novice, you were brilliant.” Verdana clapped her arm around my shoulder. “But speaking in public is also a matter of knowing when to stop. You always want to leave your audience wanting more.”
            “And do you think the audience did?”
            She squeezed my shoulder. “Of course they did. They clapped, didn’t they? Boston audiences are difficult to rouse, believe me. But you did, and now they want more.”
            I nodded. Perhaps that had been the problem with my French classes. No student had ever wanted more.
            “And how does it feel?” she pressed. “To leave them wanting more.”
            Here on stage I’d felt almost like a different person. Brave, gutsy, and confident. I wouldn’t mind feeling that way every day. What was it about this stage that had caused me to throw caution aside and just express my feelings?
            Her eyes widened as we both waited for me to put words to my emotions.
            “Liberating,” I said.
           
(C) 2017 Excerpt from copyrighted Mistress Suffragette by Diana Forbes (Penmore Press, 2017)




Diana Forbes is a 9th generation American, with ancestors on both sides of the Civil War. Diana Forbes lives and writes in Manhattan. When she is not cribbing chapters, Diana Forbes loves to explore the buildings where her 19th Century American ancestors lived, loved, survived and thrived. Prior to publication, Diana Forbes’s debut won 1st place in the Missouri Romance Writers of America (RWA) Gateway to the Best Contest for Women’s Fiction. A selection from the novel was a finalist in the Wisconsin RWA “Fab Five” Contest for Women’s Fiction. Mistress Suffragette won 1st place in the Chanticleer Chatelaine Award’s Romance and Sensual category, and was shortlisted for the Somerset Award in Literary Fiction. Mistress Suffragette won Silver in the North American Book Awards and was a Winner of the Book Excellence Awards for Romance. Mistress Suffragette was also a Kirkus Best Indies Book of 2017. The author is passionate about vintage clothing, antique furniture, ancestry, and vows to master the quadrille in her lifetime. Diana Forbes is the author of New York Gilded Age historical fiction.






 


Thursday, February 22, 2018

Guest Post and Giveaway: The Amber Elixir by Ariella Moon


Title: The Amber Elixir
Author: Ariella Moon
Series: A Two Realms Novella, #1
Publication date: October 3rd 2017
Genres: Fantasy, Young Adult
Viviane, the new Lady of the Lake and High Priestess of Avalon, accepts a challenge from Merlin unaware her bold actions will have tragic consequences. Two of her priestesses are turned to stone. A forbidden love deserts her. Now alone, she has six young handmaidens to train and protect.
When Morgan le Fay demands assistance with a spell that could change the balance of power in the Two Realms, Viviane refuses her. But what if Morgan’s secret knowledge could restore the stone priestesses? Will an alliance prompt Viviane’s love to return? Or will the gamble cost her all she holds dear?





I asked the lovely Ms. Moon what her top 10 Battle Weapons would be and she happily obliged! I think you can tell by this list that she has a lovely sense of humor and a love of Sci-Fi. 


Top 10 Battle Weapons
1. Light Sabers
2. Druid Spells
3. Elven- or Dwarf-crafted Swords
4. Flaming Arrows
5. Tweets
6. Giants
7. Wit
8. Dragons
9. Friends with anger management issues
10. Gossip






Ariella Moon draws upon her experiences as a shaman and former teen to create magical Young Adult fiction. Her series include The Two Realms Trilogy, a medieval Scotland and Fairy fantasy adventure, and The Teen Wytche Saga, a series of sweet contemporary paranormal romances. Moon’s “Covert Hearts” appears in Second Chances: A Romance Writers of America Collection.
Ms. Moon spent her childhood flying to rooftops in her dreams and searching for a magical wardrobe that would transport her to Narnia. Extreme math anxiety and taller students who mistook her for a leaning post, marred her youth. Despite these horrors, she graduated summa cum laude from the University of California at Davis. She lives a nearly normal life doting on her extraordinary daughter, two shamelessly spoiled dogs, and a media-shy dragon.


XBTBanner1


Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Book Review: Hug Chickenpenny: The Panegyric of an Anomalous Child by S. Craig Zahler


Media Type: Print Book (ARC)
Title: Hug Chickenpenny: The Panegyric of an Anomalous Child
Author: S. Craig Zahler
Publisher: Cinestate
Pages: Paperback; 264
Release Date: January 23, 2018
Source: Publisher
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Content Screening: Mild Violence

HDB Rating: 3 Keys to My Heart

Recommended to: Readers who enjoy coming of age stories that are a little bit on the quirky side, but full of heart!

Add it on: Goodreads | Amazon | B&N
"S. Craig Zahler is certain to become one of the great imaginers of our time." ― Clive Barker

Hug Chickenpenny is an anomalous child. Born from tragedy and unknown paternity, this asymmetrical and white-haired baby inspires both ire and pity at the orphanage, until the day that an elderly eccentric adopts him as a pet. The upbeat boy's spirit is challenged in his new home and as he is exposed to prejudiced members of society in various encounters. Will Hug and his astronautical dreams survive our cruel and judgmental world?

S. Craig Zahler is an award-winning screenwriter, director, novelist, cinematographer, and musician. He wrote and directed the films Bone Tomahawk and Brawl in Cell Block 99, and is the author of several novels, including Wraiths of the Broken Land, A Congregation of Jackals, and Mean Business on North Ganson Street.

Where to begin with this book? Hug Chickenpenny: The Panegyric of an Anomalous Child is unlike anything that I've read before. It's a coming of age story, but with a fantasy bent that makes it completely unique. I can promise that whatever you think you're going to find in these pages you're, at most, only about half right. If you've seen Bone Tomahawk, you might have a general idea about the brilliant oddness that Zahler can create. Just go into this book with an open mind, and prepare yourself for an anomalous journey.

As a character, Hug Chickenpenny wins the award for the quickest I've ever grown attached to anyone. From the moment of Hug's unusual entry into the world, the reader is shown how much he has stacked against him. See, Hug isn't exactly a "normal" child. In the broadest sense of the word, he's quite different. Which of course then sets the stage for his rather rough, and equally intriguing, childhood. Hug's ability to see the good in people and situations, that I would be railing madly at, is really what endeared him to me. No matter how dark things became, Hug was always a ray of light and that is really the most beautiful part of this book.

In terms of plot, there's not a lot that I can say without spoiling things so I'll tread carefully. To say that Hug's story is interesting is actually somewhat of an understatement. Hug probably goes through more in the duration of this book than most of us do in a lifetime. Poor thing. I loved the characters that S. Craig Zahler brought into his path, and especially appreciated those who could see past Hug's outer "otherness". However the book started to lose me somewhere around the mid-point, when it strayed too far into the fantasy aspect of everything. I liken it to following a steady trail of breadcrumbs into a forest, only to find halfway through that it had been entirely eaten by birds. I was left wandering towards the ending, which then came rushing up too quickly. I almost felt a bit cheated overall. Especially because, in the vein of Lemony Snickett, so many sad things had happened so close together at the end. I lacked closure, and that wasn't something I enjoyed.

So, for a wholly unique plot and a character that I fell head over heels for, this book gets a solid three star rating. It's definitely outside of most of what I've read, and I adored it for that. I do warn you though, this isn't the happiest of stories. Make sure you have some tissues specifically for the ending, friends. You're going to need them.



FTC Disclosure: I received a copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. I was not monetarily compensated for my opinion.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

It's Monday! What Are You Reading? (2/20/18)


Good morning, guys and gals! Yes, I know that this will post on Tuesday. I'm writing it on a Monday though, so I'm saying it counts ;).

Here's hoping that your long weekend, if you had one, was filled with good reads and lots of quiet time. I actually had a fair bit of that, and it was a nice time to recharge. Work, and life in general, have been wearing on me the last two weeks. So it was nice to have some time to step back, be calm, and just reset.

Any time you see me vanish from here for a while, you can be assured that I'm still reading. I'm probably just taking a step back. Managing anxiety is rough at the best of times, but I'm learning more and more every day about tackling it. Thanks for bearing with me!

Now, on to the books!


Moving right along on the "tackling my languishing TBR pile" goal, I finally managed to get to Ready Player One this month! Girl Unknown was for a blog tour, and ended up being a pretty solid thriller read. Wildfire was an impulse read because I knew it'd make me happy (it did) and I love some Mad Rogan!

My current read, a.k.a. the read I'm actually focusing on, is The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. I LOVE Flavia De Luce. She's so mischievous, and smart beyond belief! Following her through a story is always a good choice!


Next in line is The Tombs by Deborah Schaumberg. I got sent this as a review copy, and I'd be lying if I said I wasn't completely intrigued. Just look at this cover! Expect a review very soon!


That's it for me! What are you reading this week?

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Happy Valentine's Day!


Happy Valentine's Day, bookish guys and gals!

Here's hoping that, whether you're a solo celebrator or part of a couple,  you got to do something nice today! You know... like buy books. Lots of books. Get that TBR going.

Also, non-bookish people out there, you know what the best gift ever is?

Quiet Reading Time.

Yup, it's free, and it's amazing. Just saying.

We love you all bunches!

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Book Review: Girl Unknown by Karen Perry


Media Type: Print Book
Title: Girl Unknown
Author: Karen Perry
Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.
Pages: Hardcover; 304
Release Date: February 6, 2018
Source: TLC Book Tours / Publisher
-----------------------------------------------
Genre: Thriller

HDB Rating: 3 Keys to My Heart

Recommended to: Readers who enjoy thrillers that are slow burns.

Add it on: 

How quickly could the family we have created for ourselves unravel—and how far will we go to protect it?

David and Caroline Connolly are swimming successfully through their marriage’s middle years—raising two children; overseeing care for David’s ailing mother; leaning into their careers, both at David’s university teaching job, where he’s up for an important promotion, and at the ad agency where Caroline has recently returned to work after years away while the children were little. The recent stresses of home renovation and of a brief romantic betrayal (Caroline’s) are behind them. The Connollys know and care for each other deeply.

Then one early fall afternoon, a student of sublime, waiflike beauty appears in David’s university office and says, “I think you might be my father.” And the fact of a youthful passion that David had tried to forget comes rushing back. In the person of this intriguing young woman, the Connollys may have a chance to expand who they are and how much they can love, or they may be making themselves vulnerable to menace. They face either an opportunity or a threat—but which is which? What happens when their hard-won family happiness meets a hard-luck beautiful girl?

Girl Unknown is the first thriller that I've read this year, and I have to say that it was a nice change of pace. Although this book wasn't everything I wanted it to be, there was a lot to love. Imagine a family that is trying their best to knit their lives back together, when suddenly a bomb is dropped in their midst. A previously unknown person, an unexpected daughter, falls right into the middle of their rocky relationships. That's the premise behind Girl Unknown. How do you deal with someone who might not be exactly who they say they are?

The fact of the matter is that this book is not what I was expecting, because I was expecting more of the thriller aspect and less of the familial drama side of things. That being said, Girl Unknown is going to greatly appeal to any reader who is very into character personalities and drama that you can cut with a knife. Karen Perry uses most of this book to show us the character perspective of what Zoe is to each of them. As the story unfolds, we find out more and more about how Zoe is definitely not what she seems to be, and see why the choices that David and Caroline make are really pushing things towards their climax. If we're talking intense studies on character psyches, this book has that in droves. What it lacks though, because of this, is real forward movement.

See, the book spends so much time dealing with the slow decline of David and Caroline's relationship and Zoe's manipulation of them, that it doesn't have a lot of time to spend on the thriller portion of the story. This felt like a read that was very easy to anticipate. The plot was well formed, but it was also easy to see where Zoe's story was going next. As such, there was never that surprise or shock that usually comes along with books like this. It was interesting, well-written, and had great characters. It just didn't have any oomph to it.

So, that's why I'm on the fence about this book. Technically, it's fairly perfect. It's not a bad read, by any means, and actually flies by pretty quickly. It just didn't catch me up in its web like I expected it to. I wanted more punch, and more pizzazz. If you appreciate thrillers that are more formulaic, and take a deep dive into the the inner thoughts of the characters, you'll definitely love Girl Unknown.




FTC Disclosure: I received a copy of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review. I was not monetarily compensated for my opinion.

Monday, February 5, 2018

Author Interview + Giveaway: Your One & Only by Adrianne Finlay


Good morning everyone, and happy Monday!

Sorry for the lapse over the weekend, but I ended up with that evil cold that's circulating and I did a whole lot of nothing. Which, to be honest, was kind of nice. At least I get to start my week with an amazing blog tour! Today's spotlight is on Your One & Only by Adrianne Finlay, and you're not going to want to miss this.


Your One and Only
Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers
Release Date: February 6, 2018
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy
Jack is a walking fossil. The only human among a sea of clones. It’s been hundreds of years since humanity died off in the slow plague, leaving the clones behind to carry on human existence. Over time they’ve perfected their genes, moving further away from the imperfections of humanity. But if they really are perfect, why did they create Jack?

While Jack longs for acceptance, Althea-310 struggles with the feeling that she’s different from her sisters. Her fascination with Jack doesn’t help. As Althea and Jack’s connection grows stronger, so does the threat to their lives. What will happen if they do the unthinkable and fall in love?

Now, if you're like me, this probably sounds like something that you definitely need to read. Humans, clones, forbidden love, what's not to love about that? Don't worry, I'll add the links where you can track and pre-order this book below, but don't forget to keep reading on and see how Adrianne Finlay expertly answered the interview questions that I sent over!





1) Hello Adrianne, and welcome to HDB! I thought we'd start with a quick lightning round, to get to know you!
Hello!

* My favorite place to read is _anywhere if I’m on vacation_____.

* I can't live without _black tea_____ to eat/drink while I write.

* One book I'd absolutely recommend right now is _The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin_____.

* One fun fact about me is _I make cold process soap that I sell at craft fairs_____.


2) What caught my eye about Your One & Only was that it delves into the idea of what makes up a human being. Would you agree, and where did the idea spring from?

Your One & Only is very much about what it means to be human. I came up with idea after reading an article about the ethical implications of cloning a Neanderthal. It talked about how, even if we had the capability, it would be morally irresponsible, because the resulting being would have no connection to our modern world—no community, no family, no culture. I was drawn to the idea of a story about a character so out of place, the only one of his kind. Instead of writing a Neanderthal clone, I imagined a future world where humanity had evolved in some fundamental way, and then that world is introduced to a 21st century human. He is seen as primitive and distinctly different from everyone else, and it becomes a way to explore our notions of what it means to be human. The clones have “evolved” away from their humanity, and we then must consider what they’ve lost, and what it is that makes Jack so different from them; I other words, what it is that makes him human.


3) Was there any part of this book that was harder to write than another? Any breakthrough moments that really thrilled you?

The writing process becomes something of a blur once it’s done, and in hindsight it feels like it went smoothly—which is of course entirely nonsense. Every step is work, focus, and patience. There were a few places in the book that I found really fun to write, but I can’t really talk about them without spoiling part of the story. I don’t generally write with an outline, so I like those moments when your own characters surprise you, and make decisions that you didn’t necessarily see coming.


4) If Your One & Only was being made into a movie, what would the tagline say?

“In 2407, humans are a thing of the past”


5) Finally, and thank you again for all the wonderful answers, what would you say to readers out there looking to pick up your books?

Thank you so much for having me! I would say to readers that I hope they enjoy reading about Jack and Althea and the clones as much as I enjoyed writing about them. I started the book because it was an idea I really wanted to read, so part of me is actually a little jealous and wishes I could have just been a reader, instead of slogging through all that drafting and revision. Is that weird? ☺


Originally from Ithaca, New York, Adrianne Finlay now lives in Cedar Falls, Iowa with her husband, the poet J. D. Schraffenberger, and their two young daughters. She received her PhD in literature and creative writing from Binghamton University, and is an associate professor of English at Upper Iowa University in Fayette, Iowa.

She is also an avid soap maker, and sells handmade soap locally to raise money for type 1 diabetes research.

https://semisweetsoaps.com/



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Friday, February 2, 2018

February Reading Plans


Hi fellow bookworms! Yes, this is going to be one of those rambling posts where I just type at you and don't put a whole bunch of formatting and photos. If you want to run away now, I'll understand. Otherwise, I'm here to tell you a bit about my February reading plans!

See, I've pretty much given up on TBR lists at this point. I've let you know before that at the end of last year I was burnt out. Everything I read felt forced, it felt like a chore to finish a book, and I was feeling the drag of all that. So I promised myself that this year I wouldn't let that happen. I promised myself that I'd allow myself to hop from book to book without shame, and put things aside if I wasn't feeling them. That freedom has been great and it's working! I mean, I finished and mostly loved 11 whole books last month!

That means my reading plans for February are pretty much to keep doing what I've been doing! I'm reading Hug Chickenpenny: The Panegyric of an Anamalous Child for a review. Zenith, Sunburn and Ink, Iron and Glass are also on my review list for the month. Other than that, it'll be attacking things as they come. My goal to read one non-fiction book a month continues, but all of books are on hold at the library so we'll see what comes down the pipeline first. Hahaha.

Happy February reading all!

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